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LANDSCAPE MAINTENANCE SCHEDULE

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January February March April May June July August September October November December

By carefully designing the landscape, the total amount of work required can be reduced. Adapted plant materials that will not outgrow their locations or require excessive care should be selected. Some plants are also less susceptible to insect and disease damage. Durable building materials should be used outdoors. A landscape should be an enjoyable asset, not a liability that requires constant attention.

The following maintenance schedule. is a checklist of annual gardening activities. By attending to these matters at the proper time, a major part of the maintenance will be preventative rather than remedial.


JANUARY

Ornamentals, Trees, Shrubs
  • If rainfall has been deficient, water lawns, trees, and shrubs, especially the broadleaf and narrow leaf evergreens. Check moisture in protected areas or raised planters.
  • Generally, most pruning of trees and shrubs is best done in late winter. Spring blooming shrubs should be pruned after blooming. Don't prune unless there is a reason to do so. See OSU Pub. 6409 - Pruning Ornamental Trees and Shrubs.
  • Use horticultural oil spray in dormant doses to control overwintering insects on deciduous trees and shrubs if not treated in November or December. Scale, mites, galls, overwintering aphids, and other insects can be a serious problem of many woody ornamental and fruit plants. Dormant oil sprays should be applied when the temperature is above 40 degrees F. in late fall and winter. Do not use "dormant" oils on evergreens. See 7306 - Ornamental and Lawn Pest Control.

Turfgrass

  • Mow cool season grasses at 2 to 3 inches high at a mower height of 2 1/2 inches. Mowing should be frequent enough to remove not more than one-third of the leaf blade per cutting.
  • Water turf if rainfall has been deficient. Check moisture in protected areas.
Vegetables
  • Miscellaneous
  • Sharpen, paint, and repair gardening tools and equipment (mowers, edgers, sprayers, dusters, etc.) Balance cutting blades on mowers and edgers.
  • Check irrigation lines, hoses, and sprinklers and replace worn or broken parts.
  • Check supplies of fungicides, insecticides, and herbicides. Secure a copy of current recommendations and post them in a convenient place. Also see OSU Pub. 7450 - Safe Use of Pesticides in the Home and Garden.

FEBRUARY

Fruits and Nuts Ornamentals, Trees, Shrubs
  • Fertilize trees (including fruit and nut) and shrubs. It is best to fertilize in both the spring and fall. Divide the fertilizer equally between spring and fall.
  • Dormant oil spray can still be applied to control overwintering insects such as scale, mites, galls, aphids, etc, on deciduous trees and shrubs if not yet treated. Dormant oil sprays should be applied when the temperature is above 40 degrees F. Do not use "dormant" oils on evergreens. See OSU Pub. 7306 - Ornamental and Lawn Pest Control for control.
  • Finish pruning shade trees and summer flowering shrubs such as vitex. Prune evergreen hedges early spring before new growth begins. Spring blooming shrubs such as forsythia and spirea may be pruned immediately following flowering. See OSU Pub. 6409 - Pruning Ornamental Trees and Shrubs.
  • Most bare-rooted trees and shrubs should be planted in February or March before bud break. Once buds begin to swell, this signals the roots to begin putting on new growth. Later plantings should be balled and burlapped or container grown. See OSU Pub. 6414 - Planting Shade Trees and Shrubs.
Soil Turfgrass See also -- Oklahoma Turfgrasses-Characteristics/Maintenance
  • Mow cool season grasses at 2 to 3 inches high at a mower height of 2 1/2 inches. Mowing should be frequent enough to remove not more than one-third of the leaf blade per cutting.
  • Water turf if rainfall has been deficient. Check moisture in protected areas.
Vegetables
  • Don't forget that all plants need water in winter as well as summer. This is especially true when windy and low humidity conditions prevail. Evergreens are especially vulnerable to winter water loss and freeze damage. See OSU Pub. 6404 - Winter Protection of Landscape Plants.
  • Few insects active but preplant applications for cutworms, white grubs, and wireworms can be made, if needed in late February.
  • Please read the label when using pesticides. Verify the use of the chemical for that particular plant. Also note the "days to harvest" waiting period before the vegetable can be harvested and consummed.

MARCH

Ornamentals, Trees, Shrubs -- See Also -- Solving issues with plant and incect diseases
  • Major planting season. Many trees and shrubs such as magnolia, pine, holly, pecan, sweet gum, and strawberries are best planted this month.
  • Cultivate annual flower beds to destroy winter weeds. Do not cultivate around shrubs, especially azaleas. Pull these weeds.
  • Prune roses just before growth starts, and begin a regular disease spray program as the foliage appears. See OSU Pub. 6403 - Rose Culture in Oklahoma ; and 7607 - Diseases of Roses . Continue weekly treatment during the rainy season.
  • Divide and replant summer and fall blooming perennials, such as chrysanthemums.
  • Mow old liriope foliage before new growth begins, cut back pampas grass and other ornamental grass foliage.
  • Control of galls (swellings) on stems of oak, hackberry, pecan, elm and honeylocus should begin now. Prune off as many limbs as practical. See OSU Pub. 7306 - Ornamental and Lawn Pest Control ; and 7168 Plant Galls Caused by Insects for control.
  • Anthracnose control on Sycamore, maple, and oak should begin at bud swell and when the leaf is half grown and at maturity. See OSU Pub. 7634 - Anthracnose and Other Common Leaf Diseases of Deciduous Shade Trees
  • Pine tip blight control on Austrian pine begins at bud swell. See OSU Pub. 7618 - Common Diseases of Conifers in Oklahoma .
  • The 1st generation of Nantucket Pine Tip Moth appears at this time. Begin pesticide applications in late March. See OSU Pub. 7306 - Ornamental and Lawn Pest Control for control.
  • Other Ornamental and shade tree pests that may appear this month.

Turfgrass See also -- Oklahoma Turfgrasses-Characteristics/Maintenance

  • Water turf if rainfall has been deficient. Check moisture in protected areas.
  • Fall applications is best, but, if needed broadleaf weeds can be controlled in cool-season grasses with post-emergent broadleaf herbicides. See OSU Pub. 6421 - Controlling Weeds in Home Lawns.
  • For cool season grasses apply one pound actual nitrogen per 1000 square feet once or twice in March through May. Fertilize again in September and November. Never fertilized fescue in summer, it enhances disease development and heat stress.
  • Mow--cool season grasses at 2 1/2-3 1/2 inches high, warm season 1 1/2 to 2 inches. Mowing should be frequent enough to remove not more than one-third of the leaf blade per cutting.
  • Fall is far and away the best time to seed cool season grasses, spring is second best. Much of the spring seeded grass will die in summer due to inadequat root development.. See OSU Pub. 6419 - Establishing a Lawn in Oklahoma.
  • Remove the thatch (old growth and clippings) on improved bermudas before crabgrass control treatment.
  • Apply pre-emergent crabgrass control chemicals mid-February through mid-March. Some will need a second application.(Do not apply pre-emergent to areas to be renovated.) See our herbicide section for a preemergent information sheet.
Vegetables
  • Please read the label when using pesticides. Verify the use of the chemical for that particular plant. Also note the "days to harvest" waiting period before the vegetable can be harvested and consummed.
  • See our information page regarding pests and diseases for helpful recommendations..

April

  • Most bedding plants, summer flowering bulbs, such as gladiolus and dahlias, and annual flower seeds can be planted after danger of frost is past (around mid-April).
  • Let spring flowering bulb foliage remain as long as possible before removing. As long as the foliage is green it is feeding the bulbs for next years growth..
  • Remove any winter-damaged branches or plants that have not begun to grow. Prune spring blooming shrubs after blooming is complete, but prune only if you have a reason to do so. See our pruning section in the trees and shrub general information section.
  • Watch for Cedar-Apple rust. When the orange jelly galls have formed on junipers following a rain, begin treating apple and crabapple trees with a fungicide. Nearby native cedars make control difficult. See OSU Pub. 7611 - Cedar-Apple Rust.
  • Gather and review OSU information for control of Pine needle diseases. See OSU Pub. 7618 - Common Diseases of Conifers in Oklahoma.
  • Fire blight is a bacterial disease common in trees and shrubs in the rose family this time of year. Most commonly involved are pears, apples, crabapples, pyricantha and others. For information as to control, see OSU information sheet here..
  • Powdery mildew (white coating on leaves) may occur during wet seasons on crapemyrtle, lilac, roses and many other plants. Early detection and treatment are necessary to remedy the problem. See OSU Pub. 7617 - Powdery Mildews of Ornamentals & Fruit Shade & Nut Trees.
Turfgrass See also -- Oklahoma Turfgrasses-Characteristics/Maintenance
  • Mow cool season grasses at 2 1/2 to 3 1/2 inches high, warm season 1 1/2 to 2 inches. Mowing should be frequent enough to remove not more than one-third of the leaf blade per cutting.
  • Water mature grass to wet soil 4-6 inches deep when footprint impressions remain after walking over lawn.
  • Fertilize warm season grasses on quick release program with one pound of nitrogen (only) per 1000 square feet. Fertilize warm season grasses on the slow release program with 1 2/3 pounds of slow release nitrogen per 1000 square feet.
  • Start vegetative planting of warm season lawns in late month. Sod or sprig as appropriate for the grass variety desired. See OSU Pub. 6419 - Establishing a Lawn in Oklahoma.
  • Damage from Spring Dead Spot(SDS) becomes visible in Bermudagrass this month. SDS can be confused with winter kill in Bermuda.For help in diabnosis and control, see OSU Pub. 7665 - Managing Spring Dead Spot Disease of Bermudagrass in Oklahoma.
  • Watch for grub damage in lawns. See OSU Pub. 7306 - Ornamental and Lawn Pest Control for control.
Vegetables
  • Please read the label when using pesticides. Verify the use of the chemical for that particular plant. Also note the "days to harvest" waiting period before the vegetable can be harvested and consummed.
  • This web site has helpful information on diagnosing and treating various disease and insect problems in vegetables..
General
  • Be alert for both insect pests and predators. Hand pick if possible. Only use a pesticide if there are too few predators to be effective.

MAY

Ornamentals, Trees, Shrubs
  • Annual bedding plants, such as coleus copper plant, and geranium, can be set out for summer color.
  • Soak new transplants, unless rainfall is abundant. Be sure to get water to the roots of newly planted trees and shrubs, but do not drown them by watering too much or too often.
  • Pine needle disease treatments are needed in mid month. See OSU Pub. 7618 - Common Diseases of Conifers in Oklahoma.
  • Insect alert.
    • Bagworms on juniper and arborvitae.
    • Elm leaf beetles and larvae on elms.
    • Mimosa webworms on mimosa and honeylocus.
    • Lacewing bugs on sycamore and pyrancantha.
  • Be sure to spray the underside of leaves where insects hide. Repeat spray if it rains within 24 hours. See OSU Pub. 7306 - Ornamental and Lawn Pest Controll.
Turfgrass
  • Mow cool season grasses at 2 1/2 to 3 1/2 inches high, warm season 2 inches. Mowing should be frequent enough to remove not more than one-third of the leaf blade per cutting.
  • Water mature grass to wet soil 4-6 inches deep when footprint impressions remain after walking over lawn.
  • If you did not fertilize cool season grasses (fescues) in March and April an application may be made now. Do not fertilize cool season lawns again until September. Applying fertilizer to these lawns in summer is harmful..
  • Fertilize warm season grasses on quick release program with one pound of nitrogen (only) per 1000 square feet. Do not fertilize warm season grasses this month when on the slow release program.
  • Aerification of warm season lawn prior to seeding.
  • Start seeding of warm season lawns in mid month. Seed as appropriate for the grass variety desired. See OSU Pub. 6419 - Establishing a Lawn in Oklahoma.
  • Vegetative planting of warm season lawns can continue this month. Sod or sprig as appropriate for the grass variety desired. Seed as appropriate for the grass variety desired. See OSU Pub. 6419 - Establishing a Lawn in Oklahoma. .
  • Post-emergent treatment for Nutsedge are best applied this month. Make certain warm-season grasses have completed green-up. See OSU Pub. 6421 - Controlling Weeds in Home Lawns. See also our section on herbicides for specific suggestions about nutsedge control. The common broadleaf herbicides are poorly effective on nutsedge.
  • Second application of pre-emergent annual grass herbicides can be applied late month if the label of your herbicide suggests two applications in spring. See OSU Pub. 6421 - Controlling Weeds in Home Lawns..
Vegetables
  • Please read the label when using pesticides. Verify the use of the chemical for that particular plant. Also note the "days to harvest" waiting period before the vegetable can be harvested and consummed.

JUNE

General
  • Cultivate and mulch. Avoid tilling high clay soils when wet, this destroys the soil structure.
  • Continue to water deeply as needed. Apply at least one inch of water each time. Water after light showers for better water usage.
Ornamentals, Trees, Shrubs
  • Remove or shorten vigorous or unwanted limbs on new trees. Watch for forks in the main trunk and remove the least desirable trunk as soon as it is noticed. See OSU Pub. 6415 - Training Young Shade and Ornamental Trees.
  • Take softwood cuttings from new growth of woodies to propagate.
  • Pine needle disease treatments are needed again mid month. See OSU Pub. 7618 - Common Diseases of Conifers in Oklahoma.
  • Insect alert. See our insect section for more information.
    • Bagworms on juniper and arborvitae.
    • Elm leaf beetles and larvae on elms.
    • Mimosa webworms on mimosa and honeylocus.
    • Lacewing bugs on sycamore and pyrancantha.
    • Spider mites on a host of plants. They are a problem during hot, dry weather. Two or more treatments normally required.
    • Two-lined spittle bugs on hollies.
See also -- Oklahoma Turfgrasses-Characteristics/Maintenance
  • Mow cool season grasses at 3 inches high, warm season at 2 1/2 inches. Mowing should be frequent enough to remove not more than one-third of the leaf blade per cutting.
  • Water mature grass to wet soil 4-6 inches deep when footprint impressions remain after walking over lawn.
  • Do not fertilize cool season grasses this month.
  • Fertilize warm season grasses on quick release program with one pound of nitrogen (only) per 1000 square feet. Fertilize warm season grasses on the slow release program with 1 2/3 pounds of slow release nitrogen per 1000 square feet.
  • Brown patch disease of cool-season grasses may show up. This is difficult to detect and treat. Go to the OSU reference on dealing with brown patch in fescue for help.
  • Seeding of warm season lawns completed by middle of month. Seed as appropriate for the grass variety desired. 6419 - Establishing a Lawn in Oklahoma .
Vegetables
  • Please read the label when using pesticides. Verify the use of the chemical for that particular plant. Also note the "days to harvest" waiting period before the vegetable can be harvested and consummed.


JULY

General
  • Water demand by most plants increases with summer heat. Most plants need at least 1 inch of water per week. This includes trees, shrubs, ornamentals, vegetables and warm season turfgrass. Fescue lawns need 2 inches of water per week.
Ornamentals, Trees, Shrubs
  • Expect some leaf fall. Clear yellow leaves are a normal reaction to drought. Water young plantings and container-grown plants well. As heat intensifies young plants may need water every two to three days. Arrange for watering when vacationing.
  • Spider mites on a host of plants. They are a problem during hot, dry weather. Two or more treatments normally required.
  • Obscure scale insect crawlers become active in July and August on pin oaks, burr oaks and pecans among others. Control during crawler stage. See OSU Pub. 7306 - Ornamental and Lawn Pest Control.
Turfgrass
  • Mow cool season grasses at 3 inches high, warm season at 2 1/2 inches. Mowing should be frequent enough to remove not more than one-third of the leaf blade per cutting.
  • Water mature grass to wet soil 4-6 inches deep when footprint impressions remain after walking over lawn.
  • Brown patch disease of cool-season grasses may show up See OSU Pub. 6420 - Lawn Management in Oklahoma.
  • Do not fertilize cool season grasses this month.
  • Fertilize warm season grasses on quick release program with one pound of nitrogen (only) per 1000 square feet. Do not fertilize warm season grasses this month when on the slow release program.
  • Control unwanted bermudagrass with one of the new grass-only killing herbicides.
  • Vegetative planting of warm season lawns completed by end of month. Seed as appropriate for the grass variety desired. 6419 - Establishing a Lawn in Oklahoma.
Vegetables
  • Please read the label when using pesticides. Verify the use of the chemical for that particular plant. Also note the "days to harvest" waiting period before the vegetable can be harvested and consummed.

AUGUST

Ornamentals, Trees, Shrubs
  • Water all planting thoroughly unless rainfall has been adequate.
  • Divide and replant spring blooming perennials such as iris, peonies, and daylilies.
  • Hedges and shrubs can be pruned, if necessary, about mid-August.
  • Pinewood nematode often kills Scotch and Japanese black pines under drought stress. These is no current control.
  • Turfgrass

  • Water mature grass to wet soil 4-6 inches deep when footprint impressions remain after walking over lawn.
  • Brown patch disease of cool-season grasses may show up. See OSU Pub. 6420 - Lawn Management in Oklahoma .
  • Mow cool season grasses at 3 inches high, warm season at 2 1/2 inches. Mowing should be frequent enough to remove not more than one-third of the leaf blade per cutting.
  • Do not fertilize cool season grasses this month.
  • Fertilize warm season grasses on quick release program with one pound of nitrogen (only) per 1000 square feet. Fertlize warm season grasses on the slow release program with 1 2/3 pounds of slow release nitrogen per 1000 square feet.
  • Winter-annual weed and annual spring grassy weed control begins about mid-month to Labor Day. Pre-emergent grassy weed control chemicals must be on the ground by September 15.
  • Watch for white grub damage in lawns.
Vegetables
  • Review your plan for the fall garden. OSU Pub. 6009 - Fall Gardening .
  • Most frost semi-tender fall vegetables should be in the ground this month.
  • Please read the label when using pesticides. Verify the use of the chemical for that particular plant. Also note the "days to harvest" waiting period before the vegetable can be harvested and consummed.
  • Water all planting thoroughly unless rainfall has been adequate.
  • Plant fall vegetable garden now.


SEPTEMBER

Ornamentals, Trees, Shrubs

  • Fertilize young trees and shrubs. It is best to fertilize in both the spring and fall. Divide the fertilizer equally between spring and fall. If only one fertilization per year is provided do it in the fall after the killing frost.
  • Select spring flowering bulbs as soon as available.

Turfgrass

  • Mow cool season grasses at 3 inches high, warm season at 2 1/2 inches. Mowing should be frequent enough to remove not more than one-third of the leaf blade per cutting.
  • Water mature grass to wet soil 4-6 inches deep when footprint impressions remain after walking over lawn.
  • Winter-annual weed and annual spring grassy weed control begins about Labor Day. Pre-emergent grassy weed control chemicals must be on the ground by September 15.
  • Brown patch disease of cool-season grasses may show up. See OSU Pub. 6420 - Lawn Management in Oklahoma.
  • In early month, Fertilize warm season grasses with one pound of actual nitrogen per 1000 square feet. Use a complete N-P-K fertilizer in 3-1-2 ratio if a soil test indicates a need otherwise use a phosphorus free fertilizer as most lawns have excessive amounts.
  • Watch for white grub damage in lawns. See OSU Pub. 7306 - Ornamental and Lawn Pest Control for control.
  • For cool season grasses apply one pound actual nitrogen per 1000 square feet using a nitrogen only fertilizer unless a soil test indicates a need for phosphorus and potassium (the second and third numbers on a fertilizer bag)..
  • Begin to establish cool-season lawns. See the turf section on this website for details.
  • Reseed bluegrass, fescue, or ryegrass as needed in shady areas.
  • Plant winter wheat for erosion control on new, sunny lawns.
  • Renew disease control efforts as needed.
Vegetables
  • Please read the label when using pesticides. Verify the use of the chemical for that particular plant. Also note the "days to harvest" waiting period before the vegetable can be harvested and consummed.

OCTOBER

Ornamentals, Trees, Shrubs
  • Plant spring flowering bulbs, such as daffodils and crocus. Tulips can be planted through November. Bulbs require well drained soils in good sunlight.
  • Dig and store tender perennials, such as dahlias and tuberoses, in a cool, dry place. .
  • Container-grown shade trees and pines can be successfully planted in the fall. Broadleaf evergreens such as holly and magnolia, or bare root plants are best planted in the spring. See OSU Pub. 6414 - Planting Shade Trees and Shrubs.
  • Start pruning the bleeders, birch, elm, maple, and willow.
  • Check form of young trees. Eliminate any forks that developed during the summer. See OSU Pub. 6415 - Training Young Shade and Ornamental Trees.
Soil Turfgrass
  • Mow cool season grasses at 2 1/2 inches high, warm season at 2 1/2 inches. Mowing should be frequent enough to remove not more than one-third of the leaf blade per cutting.
  • Water mature grass to wet soil 4-6 inches deep when footprint impressions remain after walking over lawn.
  • Mow and edge neatly before killing frost.
  • Continue to establish cool-season lawns until mid-month. 6419 - Establishing a Lawn in Oklahoma.
  • Control broadleaf weeds in well established warm or cool-season lawns with a post-emergent broadleaf weed killer. See OSU Pub. 6421 - Controlling Weeds in Home Lawns.
Vegetables
  • Please read the label when using pesticides. Verify the use of the chemical for that particular plant. Also note the "days to harvest" waiting period before the vegetable can be harvested and consummed.

Edited to here 5-13-14


NOVEMBER

Ornamentals, Trees, Shrubs
  • Just after frost before freezing weather is a good time to fertilize trees (including fruit and nut), shrubs and vines. Both spring and fall are good times to fertilize most plants. One may split the recommended application dose and apply both fall and spring. See our fertilizer section.
  • November 15 to March 15 constitutes our major pruning season. See OSU Pub. 6409 - Pruning Ornamental Trees and Shrubs.
  • Prepare the landscape for winter. See OSU Pub. 6404 - Winter Protection of Landscape Plants..
  • Scale, mites, galls, overwintering aphids, and other insects can be a serious problem of many woody ornamental and fruit plants. Apply horticultural oil sprays in "dormant" concentrations when the temperature is above 40 degrees F. in late fall and winter. Do not use "dormant" oils on evergreens. See OSU Pub. 7306 - Ornamental and Lawn Pest Control for control.
Turfgrass
  • Mow cool season grasses at 2 1/2 inches. Mowing should be frequent enough to remove not more than one-third of the leaf blade per cutting.
  • Water mature grass to wet soil 4-6 inches deep when footprint impressions remain after walking over lawn.
  • In late November, Fertilize cool season lawns with one pound of nitrogen per 1000 square feet.
  • Control broadleaf weeds in well established warm or cool-season lawns with a post-emergent broadleaf weed killer. See OSU Pub. 6421 - Controlling Weeds in Home Lawns.
  • November and December is the best time to control chickweed, dandelion, and henbit. Most trees and shrubs are less susceptible at this time. However, caution is the watch-word whenever herbicides are applied.
Vegetables
  • Please read the label when using pesticides. Verify the use of the chemical for that particular plant. Also note the "days to harvest" waiting period before the vegetable can be harvested and consummed.
Miscellaneous
  • Compost annual debris and leaves. Do not compost diseased plant parts.
  • Maintain gardening equipment
    • Drain oil and gasoline from power equipment before winter storage.
    • Clean tools.
    • Make necessary repairs.
    • Coat metal surfaces with a thin film of oil to prevent rust.
    • Drain and store water hoses.
    • Wrap hydrants.
  • Seal, re-label, and store pesticides properly. A lock can help ensure safety.
  • Repair or replace walks, drives and fences.

DECEMBER

Ornamentals, Trees, Shrubs
  • Continue pruning the bleeders, birch, elm, maple, and willow.
  • Use dormant oil spray to control overwintering insects on deciduous trees and shrubs if not treated in November. Scale, mites, galls, overwintering aphids, and other insects can be a serious problem of many woody ornamental and fruit plants. Horticultural oil spray in "dormant" concentrations should be applied when the temperature is above 40 degrees F. in late fall and winter. Do not use "dormant" oils on evergreens. See OSU Pub. 7306 - Ornamental and Lawn Pest Controll.
Turfgrass
  • Mow cool season grasses at 2 2 1/2 inches. Mowing should be frequent enough to remove not more than one-third of the leaf blade per cutting.
  • Water mature grass to wet soil 4-6 inches deep when footprint impressions remain after walking over lawn.
  • Control broadleaf weeds in well established warm or cool-season lawns with a post-emergent broadleaf weed killer. See OSU Pub. 6421 - Controlling Weeds in Home Lawns.
Vegetables
  • Cool season vegetables may continue to be harvested if grown in cold frames or some version of a "hoop house" or "high tunnel".
Miscellaneous
  • Soak all plantings before a predicted hard freeze.
  • Light pruning of evergreens can be used for Christmas decorations.
  • Recycle your live Christmas tree. They can be shredded and used for mulch either by you or taken to Tulsa's green waste site on 56th street North where they will be shredded and given to Tulsa residents as free mulch. Curbside pickup is also an option, but the tree needs to be cut and bundled into 4 foot lengths.
  • Review the year's schedule and make plans for next year's improvements.

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